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Boy oh boy! Lockdown, where do I start? Once I heard we were going on lockdown I nearly had a heart attack! Never in a millions years, did I think it will get to this. My social life had completely gone out the window! .
On March 23rd, the UK went into lockdown to prevent the spread of COVID-19. During this period, I’ve learnt that input = output. Once, one puts their efforts into a certain project, they will gain an output, but this will only be successful if you work smartly as much as you work hard.
When I first heard that lockdown was going to be enforced, I thought it would be a perfect opportunity for me to upgrade myself, expand my skill set and knowledge.
If asked how my quarantine was going to go the day Boris Johnson said schools would be closed and the whole country would be on lockdown, you would have seen a boy: confused, nervous, sceptical, anxious and a whole lot of worried feelings.
It was a fine spring morning. As usual, lessons began, and before I knew it, it was lunchtime. Near the end of our lunch break, the Deputy assistant called me and asked if I had a recent dry cough.
During this quarantine, I have found that doing school from home has been one of the hardest challenges because sometimes it may be hard to find motivation to do it. However, distance learning has made me more independent and more disciplined.
Lockdown! Once it was announced, I felt as if my social life had completely shattered. It was as if I was blocked from the outside world, my friends and my extended family. The only way to communicate “face to face” was through a phone or computer screen.
Meron is a first-year A-level student studying Maths, Biology and Psychology at a College in North West London. Meron is young achiever from North West London who is currently doing A-levels. Here are Meron's thoughts on education, inspiration and career choices.
Raphael is a Community Reporters volunteer who is very passionate about the sciences. He is currently a student at university pursing his dreams.
Community involvement is SO crucial.
Ann-Marie is an 18 year old Political Science and International Relations student. She has a YouTube channel called SpeakOut Generation where her and the co-founder highlight social and political issues in the life of the youth today.
Almira is a 21 year old, final year Law student. She enjoys yoga, meditation and writing. She reports on real issues affecting society and feels strongly that everyone should use their vote. Read her reasons here:
Thank you to all of those who have contributed to the Young People and Politics blog series! So far the blog has been a huge success!
Jenny, 18, is an English and History student. Aside from studying she spends her time volunteering in the health sector and writing about the issues she cares about including, politics, feminism and mental health. Read her argument below on why 16 year olds should be able to vote.
This blog has been written by Milli Mathews, 24, as part of our Young People and Politics series. Milli is a frequent blogger for Nutmeg and gets to the heart of the issues young people today face. Read her latest blog on the London Mayor election below:
We have collaborated with Barnet Youth Board to create a series of four blogs, getting youth opinion on a range of political issues. The opinions below are from young people aged 11 – 18 who are politically active as members of the Youth Board.
We have collaborated with Barnet Youth Board to create a series of four blogs, getting youth opinion on a range of political issues. The opinions below are from young people aged 11 – 18, who are politically active as members of the Youth Board.
We have collaborated with Barnet Youth Board to create a series of 4 blogs, getting youth opinion on a range of political issues. The opinions below are from young people aged 11 – 18, who are politically active as members of the Youth Board.
We have collaborated with Barnet Youth Board to create a series of 4 blogs, getting youth opinion on a range of political issues. The opinions below are from young people aged 11 – 18 who are politically active as members of the Youth Board.
Rebecca Clark is a Nutmeg Volunteer with a keen interest in politics. At 16, Rebecca cannot vote in the upcoming mayoral election. However she believes the youth vote is key and is speaking out here to inspire her older peers to use their vote, read her convincing argument below:
Milli is 24, a languages graduate interested in politics, the local community, and all things food.
We are welcoming our second round of submissions from young writers and vloggers as part of our young people and politics series. Entries accepted from young people aged 14-25.
Memuna, 16, is an A Level student at Woodhouse College. She is interested in politics and activism. She's become frustrated with the EU debate, read her reasons here:
Bez is an 18 year old A Level Student, who enjoys running and sports. He is passionate about politics and philosophy and believes it's important that the younger generation use their vote. Read his reasons here:
Rebecca Clark is a Nutmeg Volunteer with a keen interest in politics. She is age 16 and wishes she could have her say in the upcoming elections, read her reasons for giving 16 year olds the vote below:
Almira is a 21 year old, final year, law student She enjoys yoga. meditation and writing. She reports on real issues affecting society, she feels strongly that everyone should use their vote, read her reasons here.
This blog has been written by Milli Mathews, 24, as part of our Young People and Politics series. To find out more about, of how to submit your own blog, click here.
We are welcoming our first round of submissions from young writers and vloggers as part of our young people and politics series.
Jenna White is an A Level Student and aspiring musician. Read about her experiences here:
Hi, I'm Elena Cooper and I'm a student currently studying at Woodhouse College. I'm 16 years old and am interested in journalism as a media outlet.